Former S-125 AA missile base. Slovakia

After seeing bits of this pop up online I thought I have got to have a little look at this site, so roll on a few months (about 12) and a drive across Europe to check it out we found ourself km at the bottom of a hill with a locked gate.


About 2km up a very nice relaxing steep hill we had made it to the 1st of the remains of the base and also into a hostile mosquito breeding frenzy.  Every 10 seconds I could feel another one biting me. We had 2 hrs to check it all out, walk back to the car and get into the city and pick up my wife and daughter.


So we just rumbled through all the woods and kept finding more and more underground buildings, tunnels and other structures all over the shot, so I just decided to photograph the stuff that interested me.


History wise there is not a great deal to on on other than ‘ Built in the early 1980’s, though originally conceived as a possible radar / SAM site as early as 1972.
It’s purpose was monitoring of air space over Bratislava and antiaircraft missiles were stored here.
Base was closed in mid-1990’



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This tunnel entrance takes you into the back of the main large storage tunnels1A8A0163-Edit 1A8A0160-Edit 1A8A0162-Edit 1A8A0136 1A8A0145


There is somebody living in here, recently lit fire and his fags were just laying there with food and water, not  a bad crash pad I guess1A8A0138-Edit 1A8A0142 1A8A0149-Edit 1A8A0150 1A8A0151

Oh look. I found Ben1A8A0153 1A8A0154 1A8A0155


Night Bunkers. Norfolk-2015

My Uni project for the start of year 3 started off with a rather chilled out walk around Orford Ness in Suffolk back in September… I have always had a fascination with the remains of war and in Particular WW2.  3 months into a project I have loved shooting and I am now going to carry on further. You know you are enjoying what you are doing when you have spent many nights out in the cold  seeing some great sights and very moody skies with good mates who have helped me out and kept me company. If the weather looked calm then I would head out after 8pm armed with the camera and a map of approximate locations of the buildings I have photographed and would ask on social media if people were up for keeping me company and helping to carry photo equipment.

So thank you  Phil, David, Amanda, Ben, Davy and Faryal

The idea of this project was to just go around and document the structures in a way they have not normally been seen before…. Normally because sensible people are at home keeping warm and sleeping. But I decided to have a go at this and illuminate as many structures as I could.. I made myself a map and would just drive for 4-6 hours each night and stop at each location. All together I have driven all around Norfolk looking for the nicest looking buildings. I have even managed to upset a few landowners late at night who in the end turned out to be fine with what I was doing and even confused a few police officers who thought I was rather odd until I showed them the images and then they had to go and have a look at the Pillbox for themselves.

All the images were lit using the Westcott Icelight 2 that I would to say has become a good friend of mine now and also the Elinchrom rx2 lights and a powerpack. So a nice variety of lighting for a lot of the shots. So roll on after the christmas holidays when I will be ready for the next load of bunkers to go and shoot.

And thanks to Richard at UK Airfields for his help in identifying some of the buildings too

Happisburgh Battery 1
Happisburgh Pillbox 1
Happisburgh Battery 2
Happisburgh Pillbox 2
RAF Ludham Airfield Watch Office
RAF Ludham Airfield Watch Tower
Hulver Pillbox
Guist Pillbox
Lenwade ROC Post
Bawburgh Pillbox
Bawburgh Buildings 1
Bawburgh Buildings 2
Corton Pillbox 1
Corton Pillbox 2
Cley Next The Sea Pillbox
Corton Pillbox 3

1A8A2080-EditCaister -on-Sea pillbox 1 hour before sunrise

1A8A1688-EditWeybourne Pillbox to the right of the carpark


Hillbilly, Heron and Happisburgh

Decided as it was the school summer holidays to take Eliza out exploring and go have some fun with the cameras, also it was good to catch up with my mate Andy who I had not seen for a good few months. We headed to the Norfolk and Suffolk borders to start off with and check out two old farm houses and bits of a old WW2 airfield that had been left to rot away. After that we decided to head all the way up to the north Norfolk coast to Happisburgh to have a look at the old gun batteries and have a little dip in the sea. This was also a good opportunity to have a play around with the Cokin ND grad system and see how much fun I could have with the nice cloudy skies on what turned out to be a very nice sunny Norfolk afternoon.

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The Caves of Drach. Porto Cristo, Mallorca.

Another one of our day trips while on Holiday, this one was fab as it was well under ground so nice and cool. It again was a good chance too have a play around with the Fuji x30 in a different environment. I have got so say, it was at this point I was really missing the dslr and its capability’s, as these images are no where near as good as they could have been. but considering this is a site that the website says no photography, flash or tripods, I think it did ok. So with all the shots being sot at iso 3200 around 1/40th sec handheld you will just have to use your imagination a little as too how nice this place is in real life. As I also found out that the tour guides are not keen on you placing your camera down and illuminating the cave with 3 torches I just so happened to have in my camera bag while in holiday in spain….. Oops


The Caves of Drach were known in the Middle Ages and explored in 1880 by M.F. Will and in 1896 by E.A. Martel, who discovered the cave with the lake that bears his name.
The cave was remodelled for visitors between 1922 and 1935: a new entrance was made, paths were designed and ladders built. An electrical lighting plan designed by the engineer Carles Buigas was also installed.

The lands on which the caves are found date back to the Miocene period, and water seeping through cracks formed the shapes inside, composed of calcium carbonate together with minerals that were swept down from the surface, allowing visitors to appreciate the different shades that appear in them.

The formations that hang from the ceiling are stalactites and those that rise from the ground are stalagmites. You can also make out columns, walls and root-like stalactites. Lake Martel is around 170 metres long, and its depth varies between four and 12 metres. The cave is around 25 metres deep. The stalactites are growing at a rate of around 1 cm per 100 years.

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Military Bunker, Sa Coma Beach, Mallorca.

When the temperature reaches 40c when you are on holiday and my idea of a heat wave is 23c it was time to hit the beach.. I already knew there was some bunkers nearby, so decided to go for a dip in the sea then go look for some of the 3 bunkers I had read about. About a 10 minute walk up the beach wearing nothing but a pair of swimming shorts I found it, so tip toeing around the shards of glass I managed to scramble around and check it all out.
This was the 1st time I had managed to use my new camera for what I had intended to do so.. And all in I am more than happy with the Fuji x30 as a little 1 too take around. I also think that my little girl will be more than happy with using it when she come out exploring with me over the summer.

Locally there are 3 reported bunkers to see, but as we all know there are more than likely more to be found.
These bunkers are defensive elements built during the Spanish Civil War (1936 – 1939) in order to stop de Republican troops from landing. These bunkers can be seen in the ‘marés’ (stone) quarry and at the entrance to Punta de n’Amer from Sa Coma beach.

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Brantham, Suffolk Industrial Sunrises

Decided to pay another visit to this site again, but this time to shoot the sunrise from on top of the roof, so that meant getting out of bed at 2am to get to the site from Norfolk to the site in Suffolk for 4am.. When we got there we were soon to discover that the main building had again been set alight in the last few weeks. Such a shame as it wont be long now till it has to be pulled down on health and safety fears. Having visited the site to shoot a short video only 2 months previously I was shocked at how more trashed the site had become, so I feel that maybe I should pop back for just one more visit, there is something cool about how you 1st get to the site and it is all quiet, and then slowly the freight trains start appearing 1 by 1, and then the passenger trains start hurtling past. I often wonder how

For the sunrise shots it was another chance to have a mess around with the Cokin Grad set that I had got to have a little mess about with, and also seem to be liking a lot as well. Think it will be a case of investing in the Lee kit soon.

After having shot the sunrise we decided to go and have a little look around and see what light was bouncing around in the buildings, again it was a great chance to mess about with the Sigma 35mm A lens._MG_4487 _MG_4501 _MG_4503 _MG_4504 _MG_4508 _MG_4511 _MG_4516 _MG_4519 _MG_4520 _MG_4522 _MG_4523 _MG_4527 _MG_4528


Old Cottage. Helhoughton, Norfolk.

Found this site while on the way to visit RAF west Raynham with my photography assistant last year, completely forgot all about it until the other day, and then decoded to swing by it and take a closer look.

Unfortunately due to the nature of the property there is not a lot to go on other than it would seem that the owner had something to do with the local estate and he was an active person within the local community judging by what few possessions had been left behind.

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RAF Sculthorpe. Norfolk. 2012-2015

Thought I would post up all my images from this site I have taken over the years, you will then see why It is one of my favorite sites to jolly around. Nothing like a nice relaxed explore where you don’t have to worry about getting busted. For me the main attraction is the tell tale signs of both the UK and American services sitting side by side and you can still see some of that in a lot of the images.

History Thanks wiki

World War Two

RAF Sculthorpe was built as the second satellite airfield of RAF West Raynham a few miles to the south, the first being RAF Great Massingham. Work was begun in the spring of 1942 and the airfield was laid out as a standard RAF heavy bomber airfield with concrete runways, dispersals site, mess facilities and accommodation. Much of the construction work was completed by Irish labour working for the construction company Bovis.

As work was drawing to a close in May 1943 the first squadrons started to arrive, the first being 342 (Lorraine) Squadron of the Free French Air Force within 2 Group from RAF West Raynham. This squadron operated two flights of the Douglas Boston aircraft along with some Douglas Havoc aircraft for training, 342 Squadron stayed until 19 July 1943 when they moved to RAF Great Massingham.

On 20 July 1943 the Royal New Zealand Air Force and Royal Australian Air Force moved in with No. 487 Squadron RNZAF and No. 464 Squadron RAAF taking up residence with their Lockheed Ventura aircraft having moved from RAF Methwold before converting at Sculthorpe onto the De Havilland Mosquito. On 20 September 1943 21 Squadron moved in from RAF Oulton, also with Mosquitos to form the Sculthorpe Wing (140 Wing). The Wing stayed at Sculthorpe completing more than 100 missions before departing for RAF Hunsdon on 31 December 1943.

In January 1944 100 Group Royal Air Force No. 214 Squadron RAF moved in with Boeing Fortress aircraft for use in electronic warfare support of Bomber Command to be joined by crews from the USAAF 96th Bomb Group from RAF Snetterton Heath, known at Sculthorpe and thereafter as the 803rd Bomb Squadron of the USAAF. In April 1944 the 803rd and 214 Squadron departed for RAF Oulton leaving Sculthorpe empty for its redevelopment as a Very Heavy Bomber Base with the work not being completed until the spring of 1946.

Cold War[edit]


North American B-45A-1-NA Tornado Serial 48-010 of 86th Bomb Squadron at RAF Alconbury. This aircraft is now on display at the Museum of the United States Air Force, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.

Douglas B-66B-DL Destroyer Serial 55-0309 of the 84th Bomb Squadron.

KB-50J of the 420th Air Refueling Squadron refueling 2 Republic F-105D’s from the 36th TFW, Bitburg ABWest Germany.

Sculthorpe was refurbished for USAF use during the Berlin Crisis in 1949 and then later, in 1952, it became home for the 49th Air Division (Operational) and the 47th Bombardment Wing, who were to stay for a decade. The 49th Air Division maintained operational control of the 47th Bomb WG and the 20th Fighter-Bomber Wing which provided tactical nuclear weapons support to the Supreme Allied Commander Europe (SACEUR). Later the 81st Fighter-Bomber Wing was provided a nuclear capability and assigned to the operational control of the 49th Air Division.

The Soviet Union‘s enormous conventional force in eastern Europe posed a major problem for NATO due to the Soviets maintaining high personnel levels after World War II when most of the American and British forces had demobilized.

To counter this Soviet threat to western Europe, NATO decided to expand their tactical nuclear force by introducing the North American B-45 Tornado to the UK. The US Tactical Air Command had about 100 of these four-engined jet bombers, each capable of dropping five tactical nuclear bombs. In the summer of 1952, the Pentagon decided to deploy the 47th Bomb Wing to Sculthorpe from Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. The movement of the 49th AD, 47 Bomb Wg and the 20th FB WG was the first unit deployment since World War II.

The squadrons of the 47th Bomb WG were:

Due to a shortage of space at Sculthorpe, the 86th BS operated from RAF Alconbury as a detachment of the 47th. In addition to the B-45 squadrons at Sculthorpe, the 47th’s sister wing, the 20th Fighter-Bomber Wing with the nuclear capable North American F-84G “Thunderjet” were transferred to RAF Wethersfield in Essex.

From 1954 to 1958, the 19th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron also flew the reconnaissance version of the B-45 known as the RB-45. The 19th TRS was assigned to the 47th Bomb Wing from May 1954 to December 1958. When the 19th began to re-equip with RB-66’s during 1957, its RB-45’s were transferred to other squadrons of the 47th Bomb Wing.

By 1957, carrying 10,000 personnel it was the biggest USAFE base in Europe. In May 1958, the re-equipment of the 47th Bombardment Wing began and Douglas B-66 Destroyers began to replace the B-45s. With this equipment change, the 47th’s squadrons was redesignated Bombardment Squadron (Tactical).


During 1960–1962 the 47th also performed air refueling missions assigning KB-50J tankers to the 420th Air Refueling Squadron from 15 March 1960 to 22 June 1962. The KB-50s were specially equipped with two General Electric J47 turbojet engines that enabled the tankers to match the speed of the faster jet fighters during refueling; however most of the KB-50s were more than fifteen years old and were too slow to refuel the faster tactical jets of USAFE. The 420th ARS was inactivated on 25 March 1964.

In 1962 Project Clearwater halted large scale rotational bomber deployments to Britain with Sculthorpe, along with RAF Fairford, RAF Chelveston, and RAF Greenham Common, being turned over to USAFE for tactical air use. As a result, the 47th Bomb Wing was inactivated on 22 June 1962. A number of the aircraft were reassigned to the 42nd TRS, 10th Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at RAF Chelveston and modified with the Electronic Counter-Measures tail system. With the inactivation of the 47th, Sculthorpe was put under the command of the 7375th Combat Support Group, the 7375th was later replaced by the Detachment 1, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing .

In spring 1982 units from RAF Coltishall moved to Sculthorpe while the runway was resurfaced

During the spring and summer of 1983, units of the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing deployed to RAF Sculthorpe because their home station, RAF Lakenheath was having its runway resurfaced.

During the summer of 1984 the F-4E and F-4G squadrons from Spangdahlem AB,West Germany operated from RAF Sculthorpe to allow runway re-surfacing at Spangdahlen to take place.

During most of 1988 and part of 1989, deploying C-130 units from the 463rd TAW (Dyess AFB, TX), the 314th TAW (Little Rock AFB, AR), and the 317th TAW (Pope AFB, NC) were forced to operate from RAF Sculthorpe due to runway resurfacing at RAF Mildenhall.

In August 1989 the TR-1A squadron from RAF Alconbury operated from RAF Sculthorpe whilst Alconbury runway was resurfaced.

Present day

The airfield became inactive at the end of the Cold War. During the mid 1990s the entire technical and domestic site was sold to The Welbeck Estate Group by Defence Estates. The domestic married quarter site comprised a sizeable number of single storey ‘tobacco houses’. The housing estate was renamed ‘Wicken Village’ and following refurbishment the houses were sold. The remaining technical site including barrack blocks, PX, church, guardroom, gymnasium, community centres and extensive storage and industrial units were sold to a single purchaser and there is now a fledgling industrial park. The Welbeck Estate Group went on to acquire the nearby technical and married quarter estate at RAF West Raynham which formed just part of 36 estates acquired from Defence Estates.

The airstrip area remains in military hands, officially as an army helicopter training area, and there are exercises about twice a year. Demolition work on the hangars began in March 2009.

The only buildings that remain are: The Control Tower, The Fire Station buildings (Next to the Control Tower) & a small half moon concrete shelter (Now used by a farmer for machinery & equipment storage – there are up to 2000 cows on the grass areas)


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My wife_MG_9829

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2 year old explorerIMG_9195

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Our escort of the site from this tripIMG_9215

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Postwick new bridge

With the development of the New Northern Distribution Road well under way, I knew it would not be long till some heavy machinery came along so we could pop down and get some photos of them in action. I had hoped for static cranes, but instead had to settle for a 1000t mobile crane from Ainscough. You will most likely recognise the name as you will see them crawling up and down the motorways around the country.
This particular lift that the cranes had come to do would be spread over 3 weekends and the A47 main road would have to be shut for this to happen. With the local press keeping everybody updated with the closures and re opening of the roads it was great to see some of the work being completed well ahead of schedule

I had wanted to go check it out during the other closures, but due to other photo shoots I was just too busy, so with a photoshoot finishing at 10pm I thought it would be perfect to go and pick up my mate and go get some photos of the monster sized crane. I was a bit gutted that the crane they had this time was a smaller one, but hey ho, this thing was still a monster and much bigger than what you usually see around Norfolk. We parked the car right out of the way and headed up to the best vantage point we could find, and it was perfect as we could hear the guys talking to each other, so new we did not have long to wait for the next massive section of the bridge to be lifted into place.

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St Thomas Hospital. London

This was the 2nd visit of the day after having popped over to Thames steel. We got caught of guard there and ended up spending a lot longer there than we had anticipated. So that meant that this site we could only afford to spend 30 mins in, or the car would have been getting locked in a car park in Upminster and there being no way home.
Nice one to slayaaa for showing us around, and for the company for the rest of the day.. Top day exploring just like last time.
So it was a bit gutting when we got there and the normal access was a closed up, but a little while later we were on the inside.

When I saw this pop up online I though that looks cool and should pop down and have a look, and it did not disappoint at all. All I hope is that I can manage in another trip here and catch the sunset up the tower. I don’t think that will disappoint at all. Just another bit of interesting information…..If you cast you mind back to the original the original 28 Days later movie , parts of this building were actually in the movie.

History of the site

The building was part of St Thomas’ Hospital which was established in 1173. According to historical records St Thomas’s Hospital Medical School was founded in about 1550. It was admitted as a school of the University of London in 1900 but remained a constituent part of St Thomas’ Hospital until 1948 when it formally became part of the university. In 1982 it merged with the medical school at Guy’s Hospital to form the United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals. In turn UMDS was absorbed by King’s College London School of Medicine and Dentistry, but the dentists have since been split out into The Dental Institute.
Unlike the hospital which in recent times dropped the possessive “s”, the medical school continued with the original spelling.

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